Advanced Biomedical Research

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2017  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 146-

Vitamin D Status in Small Vessel and Large Vessel Ischemic Stroke Patients: A Case–control Study


Navid Manouchehri1, Maryam Vakil-Asadollahi2, Alireza Zandifar2, Fereshteh Rasmani3, Mohammad Saadatnia4 
1 Medical Students' Research Center, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan; Isfahan Neurosciences Research Center, Alzahra Hospital, Isfahan, Iran
2 Medical Students' Research Center, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
3 Alzahra Hospital, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
4 Isfahan Neurosciences Research Center, Alzahra Hospital, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan; Alzahra Hospital, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Mohammad Saadatnia
Isfahan Neurosciences Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Hezar Jarib Avenue, Isfahan
Iran

Background: Vitamin D insufficiency is a globally widespread issue. Recent studies have reported a high prevalence of Vitamin D deficiency in Middle-East countries. Studies have shown negative effects of Vitamin D deficiency on endothelium and related diseases such as ischemic brain stroke. Here, we assessed Vitamin D status in patients with different types of ischemic brain stroke and control group. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five patients (49.3% small vessel, 50.7% large vessel) and 75 controls, matched for age (68.01 ± 10.94 vs. 67.64 ± 10.24) and sex (42 male and 33 female) were recruited. 25(OH) D levels were measured by Chemiluminescence immunoassay. 25(OH) D status was considered as severely, moderately, or mildly deficient and normal with 25(OH) D levels of less than 5, 5-10, 10-16, and >16 ng/ml, respectively. Results: Mean ± standard error concentration of 25(OH) D in cases and controls were 17.7 ± 1.5 and 26.9 ± 1.6 (P = 0.0001), respectively. Mild, moderate, and severe Vitamin D deficiency were observed in 10.8%, 32.4%, 8.1% vs. 34.3%, 31.5%, 9.5% of small vessel and large vessel group, respectively. 21.7% of the controls were Vitamin D deficient. Vitamin D deficiency was significantly associated with higher risk for ischemic stroke, (P = 0.000, OR = 7.17, 95% confidence interval: 3.36–15.29). 25(OH) D levels were significantly higher in control group comparing to small vessel (26.9 ± 1.6 vs. 20.59 ± 2.6 P < 0.05) and large vessel (26.9 ± 1.6 vs. 13.4 ± 1.3 P < 0.001) stroke patients. Small vessel group had significantly higher levels of Vitamin D than large vessel (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Vitamin D deficiency significantly increases the risk of ischemic stroke, favoring the types with the pathogenesis of large vessel strokes.


How to cite this article:
Manouchehri N, Vakil-Asadollahi M, Zandifar A, Rasmani F, Saadatnia M. Vitamin D Status in Small Vessel and Large Vessel Ischemic Stroke Patients: A Case–control Study.Adv Biomed Res 2017;6:146-146


How to cite this URL:
Manouchehri N, Vakil-Asadollahi M, Zandifar A, Rasmani F, Saadatnia M. Vitamin D Status in Small Vessel and Large Vessel Ischemic Stroke Patients: A Case–control Study. Adv Biomed Res [serial online] 2017 [cited 2020 Oct 30 ];6:146-146
Available from: https://www.advbiores.net/article.asp?issn=2277-9175;year=2017;volume=6;issue=1;spage=146;epage=146;aulast=Manouchehri;type=0