Advanced Biomedical Research

LETTER TO EDITOR
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 28-

Designing and Manufacture of Training Simulator for Injecting and Fluid Removing of Knee Joint


Bahram Pakzad1, Hadi Karimzadeh1, Mohammad Dadgostarnia2, Maryam Mousavi1, Amirhosein Salehi1, Mojtaba Akbari3,  
1 Department of Internal Medicine, Isfahan Bone Metabolic Disorders Research Center, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
2 Clinical Skills Training Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
3 Department of Epidemiology, School of Health, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Amirhosein Salehi
Department of Internal Medicine, Isfahan Bone Metabolic Disorders Research Center, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan
Iran




How to cite this article:
Pakzad B, Karimzadeh H, Dadgostarnia M, Mousavi M, Salehi A, Akbari M. Designing and Manufacture of Training Simulator for Injecting and Fluid Removing of Knee Joint.Adv Biomed Res 2019;8:28-28


How to cite this URL:
Pakzad B, Karimzadeh H, Dadgostarnia M, Mousavi M, Salehi A, Akbari M. Designing and Manufacture of Training Simulator for Injecting and Fluid Removing of Knee Joint. Adv Biomed Res [serial online] 2019 [cited 2020 Aug 15 ];8:28-28
Available from: http://www.advbiores.net/text.asp?2019/8/1/28/256046


Full Text



Sir,

Joint diseases are common causes of referral of patients to emergency and clinics. Trauma, mechanical pain, and inflammatory joint diseases are the main causes.[1] Joint fluid accumulation is one of the most common manifestations. In most cases, fluid aspiration should be considered to check the cause.[2] In both interventions (drug injection or joint aspiration), sufficient skill is needed to prevent injury to the periarticular tissues.[3] Today, this diagnostic and therapeutic intervention is done by traditional way and under the guidance of ultrasound. General practitioners and residents of internal disease and orthopedics and infectious diseases require appropriate training in this field. Training on medical simulators is known as one of the best educational methods. In many recent studies, the group that trained by the simulators had better results compared to the control group.[4],[5],[6] The knee joint is one of the most commonly involved joints in a variety of joint diseases. We designed and manufactured an Iranian knee tap simulator for medical students to practice joint aspiration or intra-articular injection [Figure 1]. This simulator is designed like a human's knee. Knee anatomy is considered in its design. The parts of this simulator include bones (femur, tibia, fibula, and patella), plastic bands that tie these bones together (as ligaments), and silicone bag located on the knee joint. The fluid is injected through a hose into the bag. A thin aluminum layer covers the joint surface. This layer is connected to an electronic circuit. During the procedure, if the needle hits this layer, the beep sound will generate by the electronic circuit. There is a plenty of soft foam around these complexes instead of the muscles. There is a skin-like silicone layer also covers all of these simulators. All the simulator parts are produced in Iran. The lower price and the existence of an electronic circuit are the main differences between this simulator and the foreign simulators. We thank all the people who helped us in this research, especially the Clinical Training Center of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences.{Figure 1}

Acknowledgment

We would like to thank Dr. Tahereh Changiz and Dr. Nikoo Yamani.

Financial support and sponsorship

This study was financially supported by the Deputy of Research of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (grant).

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

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3Douglas RJ. Corticosteroid injection into the osteoarthritic knee: Drug selection, dose, and injection frequency. Int J Clin Pract 2012;66:699-704.
4Singh SK, Bostrom M, Popa DO, Wiley CW. Design of an interactive lumbar puncture simulator with tactile feedback. In: Proceedings of the 1994 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation. IEEE; 1994. p. 1734-9.
5Moorthy K, Jiwanji M, Shah J, Bello F, Munz Y, Darzi A, et al. Validation of a web-based training tool for lumbar puncture. Stud Health Technol Inform 2003;94:219-25.
6Waikakul S, Vanadurongwan B, Chumtup W, Assawamongkolgul A, Chotivichit A, Rojanawanich V, et al. Aknee model for arthrocentesis simulation. J Med Assoc Thai 2003;86:282-7.