Advanced Biomedical Research

LETTER TO EDITOR
Year
: 2013  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 70-

Cavernous lymphangiomas involving bilateral labia major after caesarian section


Azar Danesh Shahraki1, Mohammad Hossein Sanei2, Lila Hashemi1,  
1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
2 Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Azar Danesh Shahraki
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan
Iran




How to cite this article:
Shahraki AD, Sanei MH, Hashemi L. Cavernous lymphangiomas involving bilateral labia major after caesarian section.Adv Biomed Res 2013;2:70-70


How to cite this URL:
Shahraki AD, Sanei MH, Hashemi L. Cavernous lymphangiomas involving bilateral labia major after caesarian section. Adv Biomed Res [serial online] 2013 [cited 2020 Jul 10 ];2:70-70
Available from: http://www.advbiores.net/text.asp?2013/2/1/70/115812


Full Text

Sir,

Cavernous lymphangioma is an extremely rare benign mass in the vulva. In this study, we report a case of cavernous lymphangiomas involving the bilateral labia major after caesarian section. A 31-year-old woman with a history of previous caesarian section, G2 L2 that was delivered by caesarian section seven months before, referred to Shahid Beheshti Hospital in 2011 with symmetrical vulvar lesion that was onset form five months ago. The lesion was a small red papule similar in appearance to nevus or angium in the bilateral labia major [Figure 1]. It was removed by punched biopsy. Physical examination was normal. She did not have any particular disease in the past, and no history of radiation therapy or any other pathology. Laboratory data was normal; histological diagnoses showed cavernous lymphangioma [Figure 2]. The management of these lesions depends on type, size, and anatomical location. Two cases of cavernous lymphangioma involving the unilateral labium majora in a young woman [1] and involving the bilateral labia minor were reported. [2] In previous studies, it was discussed that increase in estrogen and progesterone levels may play a role in cavernous lymphangioma; however, in this case it was seen that after caesarian section, estrogen and progesterone levels were decreased. Hence, it can be concluded that there are other factors that might affect this lesion. Further studies with more cases are required to make a fair conclusion.{Figure 1}{Figure 2}

References

1Watanabe T, Matsubara S, Yamaguchi T, Yamanaka Y. Cavernous lymphangiomas involving bilateral labia minora. Obstet Gynecol 2010;116:510-2.
2Noël JC, Fernandez-Aguilar S, Anaf V. Cavernous lymphangioma of the vulva. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 2007;86:378-9.