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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 150

Is Vitamin D Supplementation Effective in Prevention of Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections in the Pediatrics? A Randomized Triple-Masked Controlled Trial


1 Department of Pediatrics, Child Growth and Development Research Center, Research Institute for Primordial Prevention of Noncommunicable Disease, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
2 Department of Statistics, Payam Noor University, Shiraz, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Elahe Ziaei
Department of Pediatrics, Child Growth and Development Research Center, Research Institute for Primordial Prevention of Noncommunicable Disease, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/abr.abr_149_18

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Background: This study aimed to evaluate the impact of Vitamin D supplementation on prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) in the pediatrics. Materials and Methods: This randomized, triple-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted in 2014 among 68 children and adolescents with recurrent UTI. They were randomly assigned to two groups, receiving either Vitamin D (1000 IU/daily) or placebo for 6 months. The serum concentration of Vitamin D before and after the study and the frequency of UTI during the study were recorded. Results: Overall 33 patients in the group of receiving Vitamin D and 32 in the placebo group completed the trial. The mean serum level of Vitamin D had a significant increase in the intervention group (15.80 ± 8.7 vs. 20.56 ± 8.30 ng/mL, P < 0.001) and significant decrease in the placebo group (20.43 ± 13.28 vs. 17.43 ± 9.99 ng/mL, P = 0.041). During the trial, the frequency of UTI was not significantly different between the two groups studied (P = 0.72). Both before and after the trial, the frequency of Vitamin D deficiency, insufficiency, and adequacy was not significantly different within and between groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The findings of this trial revealed that Vitamin D supplementation with the mentioned dose have not significant impact on preventing recurrent UTI. Future studies with higher doses of Vitamin D and longer follow-up are suggested.


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