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LETTER TO EDITOR
Adv Biomed Res 2017,  6:86

Capillary versus Venous Blood Glucose in Patients with Coma


Department of Tropical Medicine, Hainan Medical University, Hainan Sheng, China; Department of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Nis, Serbia; Department of Biological Science, Joseph Ayobabalola University, Nigeria; Department of Community Medicine, Dr DY Patil Medical University, Pune, Maharashtra, India; Faculty of Science, Surin Rajabhat University, Thailand

Date of Web Publication14-Jul-2017

Correspondence Address:
Viroj Wiwanitkit
Wiwanitkit House, Bangkhae, Bangkok 10160, Thailand

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2277-9175.210689

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How to cite this article:
Wiwanitkit V. Capillary versus Venous Blood Glucose in Patients with Coma. Adv Biomed Res 2017;6:86

How to cite this URL:
Wiwanitkit V. Capillary versus Venous Blood Glucose in Patients with Coma. Adv Biomed Res [serial online] 2017 [cited 2017 Nov 22];6:86. Available from: http://www.advbiores.net/text.asp?2017/6/1/86/210689

Dear Sir,

The recent publication on “comparison of capillary and venous blood glucose levels using glucometer and laboratory blood glucose level in poisoned patients being in coma” is very interesting.[1] Yaraghi et al. concluded that “capillary blood glucose measurement by using glucometer is not recommended for patients in coma.”[1] In fact, there are many previous comparative studies between blood glucose measurement from capillary and venous blood samples. For sure, it is no doubt that the results cannot be the same. Nevertheless, there are several attempts to adjust the derived laboratory values. For example, Balaji et al. recently performed a comparative study between blood glucose measurement from capillary and venous blood samples for the diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus and proposed for new cut-off value for interpretation of capillary blood glucose results.[2] In the present scenario proposed by Yaraghi et al., the coma is actually a critical condition. The rapid management is needed and the turnaround time for a laboratory test is the big issue. The use of capillary blood glucose measurement as point-of-care testing is the concept to correspond to the urgent need of laboratory results. The point-of-care glucose (POCG) testing is still considered useful. However, the problem of error can be expected. As proposed by Schifman et al., “Preanalytic factors associated with sampling capillary blood” is a big issue that the practitioner needs to concern.[3] If there is a good control, the difference can be little.[4] For the critical situation, the primary result from POCG might be used for patient management, and retesting to confirm critical results should also be parallel done.[3] Finally, it should be also noted that if there is no good quality management, the preanalytical error can be seen either in glucose measurement by capillary or in venous blood samples.[5]

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  References Top

1.
Yaraghi A, Mood NE, Dolatabadi LK. Comparison of capillary and venous blood glucose levels using glucometer and laboratory blood glucose level in poisoned patients being in coma. Adv Biomed Res 2015;4:247.  Back to cited text no. 1
[PUBMED]  [Full text]  
2.
Balaji V, Madhuri BS, Paneerselvam A, Arthi T, Seshiah V. Comparison of venous plasma glucose and capillary whole blood glucose in the diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus: A community-based study. Diabetes Technol Ther 2012;14:131-4.  Back to cited text no. 2
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3.
Schifman RB, Nguyen TT, Page ST. Reliability of point-of-care capillary blood glucose measurements in the critical value range. Arch Pathol Lab Med 2014;138:962-6.  Back to cited text no. 3
[PUBMED]    
4.
Boyd R, Leigh B, Stuart P. Capillary versus venous bedside blood glucose estimations. Emerg Med J 2005;22:177-9.  Back to cited text no. 4
[PUBMED]    
5.
Wiwanitkit V, Lekngarm P. Requisition errors for blood glucose tests: A hospital-based study. Lab Med 2007;38:559-60.  Back to cited text no. 5
    




 

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