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LETTER TO EDITOR
Adv Biomed Res 2017,  6:114

Comments on: Phenotypic and molecular identification of Nocardia in brain abscess


1 Department of Infectious Diseases, Acquired Immunodeficiency Research Center, Isfahan, Iran
2 Department of Infectious Diseases, Nosocomial Infection Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
3 Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

Date of Web Publication21-Sep-2017

Correspondence Address:
Atousa Hakamifard
Department of Infectious Diseases, Nosocomial Infection Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2277-9175.215277

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How to cite this article:
Shirani K, Hakamifard A, Poulsen AN. Comments on: Phenotypic and molecular identification of Nocardia in brain abscess. Adv Biomed Res 2017;6:114

How to cite this URL:
Shirani K, Hakamifard A, Poulsen AN. Comments on: Phenotypic and molecular identification of Nocardia in brain abscess. Adv Biomed Res [serial online] 2017 [cited 2019 Oct 15];6:114. Available from: http://www.advbiores.net/text.asp?2017/6/1/114/215277

Sir,

Recently, we published a case report entitled, “Nocardial brain abscess in a patient with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.”[1] Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, a disease of alveolar accumulation of phospholipoproteinaceous material, has been associated with nocardialbrain abscess.[2]

Authors of the present letter reviewed the letter conducted by Fatahi-Bafghi entitled as “Phenotypic and molecular identification of nocardia in brain abscess.”[3]Nocardia is a filamentous bacteria, branched Gram-positive Bacilli, aerobic, and partially acid-fast, and its diagnosis depends on staining and culture.[4] In this case, microscopic study of the brain abscess specimen revealed, long branching, filamentous, Gram-positive elements, suggestive of Nocardia. This agent was acid-fast positive, an important clue, which helped us to differentiate Nocardia from Actinomyces. This identification of Nocardia was further confirmed according to its typical and characteristic culture.

In the paper by Fatahi-Bafghi the author noticed that “phenotypic and molecular methods are necessary for accurate identification in species level of Nocardia;” however, traditional phenotypic characterization of this species is labor intensive, time-consuming and leads to misidentification; hence, the molecular methods are widely used for diagnosis, especially gene sequencing, particularly in identification of Nocardia asteroids and farcinia species, and have proven to be faster and more sensitive.[4],[5] With the new molecular analyses, conventional methods are being replaced, and in our case, the laboratory identified the asteroides species with this method.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

 
  References Top

1.
Shirani K, Poulsen AN, Hakamifard A. Nocardial brain abscess in a patient with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Adv Biomed Res 2015;4:185.  Back to cited text no. 1
[PUBMED]  [Full text]  
2.
Patel SM, Sekiguchi H, Reynolds JP, Krowka MJ. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Can Respir J 2012;19:243-5.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Fatahi-Bafghi M. Phenotypic and molecular identification of nocardia in brain abscess. Adv Biomed Res 2017;6:49.  Back to cited text no. 3
[PUBMED]  [Full text]  
4.
Sorerell TC, Mitchell DH, Iredell JR, Chen SC. Nocardia species. In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, Dolin R, editors. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Disease. 8th ed. Philadelphia: Churchill Livingstone; 2015. p. 2853-62.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Brown JM, Pham KN, McNeil MM, Lasker BA. Rapid identification of Nocardia farcinica clinical isolates by a PCR assay targeting a 314-base-pair species-specific DNA fragment. J Clin Microbiol 2004;42:3655-60.  Back to cited text no. 5
    




 

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